Full Story about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

          It’s April 3, 1968. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd of civil rights leaders and sanitation workers, calling for an economic boycott. With this in mind, he encourages a protest but that nothing, no matter what the situation may be,turns into violence. King changes tracks in his speech reminding the people that their number one goal is equality and that they are getting closer and closer to reaching the promised land. King said, “Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. But I’m not concerned about that now. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight that we, as a people, will get to the promised land!” The next day, April 4, 1968, King was shot and killed at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee by James Earl Ray. It has been a long, hard fought battle for African Americans since Dr. King’s death, but we have had so many victories. 50 years later, that same fight for equality still exists and a new generation is rising up to take the stand.

          The second of three children, Michael King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929 to parents: Michael King Sr. and Alberta Williams King. King Jr. was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, where his father was the lead pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Later on, King Sr. adopted the name Martin Luther King Sr., honoring the German Protestant religious leader, Martin Luther. His son, Michael Jr., later changed his name as well to Martin Luther King Jr. (Bio.com). King attended Morehouse College and Boston University for his post secondary education. While working on his doctorate, Martin Luther King Jr. met an aspiring singer and musician named Coretta Scott. The two married in June of 1953 and had four children together: Yolanda, Martin Luther King III, Dexter Scott and Bernice. By the time King was 25 years old, he had earned his Ph.D and was pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.

          After Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her seat to a white man, King met  with other civil rights leaders to plan a citywide bus boycott. He was chosen as the leader because he was young, well trained and very professional. In January 1957, King and sixty other ministers and civil rights activists founded the Southern Christian Leadership conference to “harness the moral authority and organizing power of black churches” (Bio.com). They also promote peaceful, non violent protests. This gave King not only his platform to stand on in the south, but also nationally as well. In 1963, King organized a march in downtown Birmingham, Alabama. Things quickly got ugly when the officers let loose fire hoses and dogs on the protestors. King along with many others were placed in jail because of this. While in jail, King said, “Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community, which has constantly refused to negotiate, is forced to confront the issue.” King and others being jailed, while still standing their ground caused nationwide attention. In the fall of 1963, King delivered his famous, “I Have A Dream” speech in front of 200,000 people in Washington D.C. In this speech, King emphasized his belief that someday everyone would get a long, no matter what ethnic background they came from.

          King organized many more marches and made many more public appearances but was growing weary because of the slow progress of civil rights in America. Even in his weariness, King went on to speak to the sanitation workers in Memphis, Tennessee. The day after he gave his speech, King, who was standing over a balcony at the Lorraine Motel, was shot and killed by James Earl Ray. Ray, a former convict with a long rap sheet decided to flee to another country, thinking he would be considered a hero somewhere else. After two months of an international manhunt, Ray was later found, apprehended and sentenced to 99 years in prison.

          Fifty years have passed by since Dr. King was killed; and the fight still goes on. Yes, we have had so many victories and yes, our ancestors paved the way so that our lives would be easier. However, because of the recent shootings, it makes me wonder if our country is reverting back into its old ways. When people say “Make America Great Again”, exactly what do they mean by that? While we don’t have to march for our voting rights and be banned from public places because of our race, we still have to protest. Today, we have the Black Lives Matter Movement, which gained national notoriety after huge amounts of Blue on Black shootings and killings. Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, Freddie Gray, Eric Garner, many others and more recently Stephon Clark were all shot and killed for matters that could have been handled a different way. All of these people were unarmed, which is the main reason why many people were infuriated. So to say the least, the fight still goes on; but thanks to Dr. King, we will continue to move forward peacefully, in a non violent protest for towards equality.

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Sir Elton John Celebrates Over 50 Years in the Music Business!

Sir Elton Hercules John (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is an English singer, pianist, and composer. He has worked with lyricist Bernie Taupin as his songwriting partner since 1967; they have collaborated on more than 30 albums to date. In his five-decade career Elton John has sold more than 300 million records, making him one of the best-selling music artists in the world. He has more than fifty Top 40 hits, including seven consecutive No. 1 US albums, 58 Billboard Top 40 singles, 27 Top 10, four No. 2 and nine No. 1. For 31 consecutive years (1970–2000) he had at least one song in the Billboard Hot 100.  He has also composed music, produced records, and has occasionally acted in films. Some of his most well known songs are: “Rocket Man”, “Bennie and the Jets”, “I Guess That’s Why They Call it The Blues” and Lion King’s: “Can You Feel The Love Tonight” and “Circle of Life”.

Elton John: I’m Still Standing-A GRAMMY® Salute aired last night on CBS. Musicians and celebrities from everywhere came to honor both John and his long time song writer, Bernie Taupin. These are the artists that came to pay tribute in song: Alessia Cara, Miley Cyrus, Kesha, Lady Gaga, Miranda Lambert, John Legend, Little Big Town, Chris Martin, Shawn Mendes, Maren Morris, Ed Sheeran, Sam Smith, and SZA.

Sir Elton John and the audience shared a special moment of tears when Neil Patrick Harris read aloud the letter that Elton John had wrote to his friend, Ryan White, 20 years after his passing. When John first met White, he was a young boy who had been diagnosed with AIDS due to a blood transfusion. The two had a very close bond and in 1990, White passed away at 18 years old, with his friend Elton John at his bedside. In the letter, John tells Ryan how many breakthroughs there have been with AIDS and how many people’s lives have been saved due to the discoveries, he only wishes that White could have been one of them.  In 1986, he joined with Dionne Warwick, Gladys Knight and Stevie Wonder to record the single “That’s What Friends Are For”, with all profits being donated to the American Foundation for AIDS Research. The song won John and the others the Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals.

After all of the performances were done, John and Taupin received there are award and thanked everyone. John ended the salute by singing two of three of his songs, the last one being sang with all the musicians that had previously performed.

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Project 4: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy still lives on!

For my fourth major project in journalism, we have been asked to find a video on the news site NEWSY and write a story on it, using that video and other sources. Because last week marked the 50th year anniversary of Dr. King’s death, I decided to use a video that was published on April 4 by Jay Strubberg about what occurred the day prior to, the day of, and how African Americans are continuing to share this legacy.

Below is the video that I will be using:

https://www.newsy.com/stories/martin-luther-king-jr-a-voice-for-all-americans/

Caption: King’s message of non violence still rings clear as America is faced with the constant struggle for peace and unity.

 

First paragraph of the story: It’s April 3, 1968. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses a crowd of civil rights leaders and sanitation workers, calling for an economic boycott. With this in mind, he encourages a protest but that nothing, no matter what the situation may be,turns into violence. King changes tracks in his speech reminding the people that their number one goal is equality and that they are getting closer and closer to reaching the promise land. King said, “Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. But I’m not concerned about that now. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight that we, as a people, will get to the promised land!” The next day, April 4, 1968, King was shot and killed at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee by James Earl Ray. It has been a long, hard fought battle for African Americans since Dr. King’s death, but we have had so many victories. 50 years later, that same fight for equality still exists and a new generation is rising up to take the stand.

Wishing Everyone a Blessed Good Friday and Resurrection Sunday!

Good Friday is the Friday before Easter Sunday, on which the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ is commemorated in the Christian faith. It is traditionally a day of fasting and penance.

Matthew 27:32-56 New International Version (NIV)
The Crucifixion of Jesus
32 As they were going out, they met a man from Cyrene, named Simon, and they forced him to carry the cross. 33 They came to a place called Golgotha (which means “the place of the skull”). 34 There they offered Jesus wine to drink, mixed with gall; but after tasting it, he refused to drink it. 35 When they had crucified him, they divided up his clothes by casting lots. 36 And sitting down, they kept watch over him there. 37 Above his head they placed the written charge against him: this is jesus, the king of the jews.

38 Two rebels were crucified with him, one on his right and one on his left. 39 Those who passed by hurled insults at him, shaking their heads 40 and saying, “You who are going to destroy the temple and build it in three days, save yourself! Come down from the cross, if you are the Son of God!” 41 In the same way the chief priests, the teachers of the law and the elders mocked him. 42 “He saved others,” they said, “but he can’t save himself! He’s the king of Israel! Let him come down now from the cross, and we will believe in him. 43 He trusts in God. Let God rescue him now if he wants him, for he said, ‘I am the Son of God.’” 44 In the same way the rebels who were crucified with him also heaped insults on him.

The Death of Jesus
45 From noon until three in the afternoon darkness came over all the land. 46 About three in the afternoon Jesus cried out in a loud voice, “Eli, Eli,[a] lema sabachthani?” (which means “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”).[b]

47 When some of those standing there heard this, they said, “He’s calling Elijah.”

48 Immediately one of them ran and got a sponge. He filled it with wine vinegar, put it on a staff, and offered it to Jesus to drink. 49 The rest said, “Now leave him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to save him.”

50 And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit.

51 At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth shook, the rocks split 52 and the tombs broke open. The bodies of many holy people who had died were raised to life. 53 They came out of the tombs after Jesus’ resurrection and[c] went into the holy city and appeared to many people.

54 When the centurion and those with him who were guarding Jesus saw the earthquake and all that had happened, they were terrified, and exclaimed, “Surely he was the Son of God!”

55 Many women were there, watching from a distance. They had followed Jesus from Galilee to care for his needs. 56 Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Joseph,[d] and the mother of Zebedee’s sons.

Resurrection Sunday (not to be confused with Easter) is the holiday that celebrates Jesus’ resurrection from the dead, which occurred three days later after he was crucified on the cross. Easter, on the other hand comes from Eostre, who is a Teutonic goddess of fertility and spring. Where as the Easter bunny, eggs and candies are all nice, let us not forget the real meaning of the holiday, which is to celebrate our Risen Savior.

Matthew 28 New Century Version (NCV)

Jesus Rises from the Dead

28 The day after the Sabbath day was the first day of the week. At dawn on the first day, Mary Magdalene and another woman named Mary went to look at the tomb.

At that time there was a strong earthquake. An angel of the Lord came down from heaven, went to the tomb, and rolled the stone away from the entrance. Then he sat on the stone. He was shining as bright as lightning, and his clothes were white as snow. The soldiers guarding the tomb shook with fear because of the angel, and they became like dead men.

The angel said to the women, “Don’t be afraid. I know that you are looking for Jesus, who has been crucified. He is not here. He has risen from the dead as he said he would. Come and see the place where his body was. And go quickly and tell his followers, ‘Jesus has risen from the dead. He is going into Galilee ahead of you, and you will see him there.’” Then the angel said, “Now I have told you.”

The women left the tomb quickly. They were afraid, but they were also very happy. They ran to tell Jesus’ followers what had happened. Suddenly, Jesus met them and said, “Greetings.” The women came up to him, took hold of his feet, and worshiped him. 10 Then Jesus said to them, “Don’t be afraid. Go and tell my followers to go on to Galilee, and they will see me there.”

 

Happy Birthday Daddy!

I woke up this morning in a good mood (really unusual because I am not a morning person). I turned on the news to check the weather, and when the news anchor said that today was March 29th, I paused for a minute.

On March 29th, 1945, my father, Thurman  Johnson was brought into this world. Today, daddy would have been 73 years old. In the fall of 2010, he passed away and even though his passing didn’t leave a huge impact on me at the time, I realize now that a girl having a father in her life is the most important thing in the world.

My favorite memory with my dad was when he visited us in Illinois from California. He stayed for about a week and I enjoyed every minute of it. We took a family photo, went out to dinner and I had a chance to watch the Chicago Bulls vs. Golden State Warriors game with him. He kept saying the whole time how GSW was going to win, and he was right. That trip was also the last time I saw my dad.

When it was time to get ready for prom, I was beyond excited, but I knew that someone was missing. Dad wasn’t there to see me off or give “encouragement” to my prom date. I didn’t even realize how much I missed him until that moment, but I am so grateful for the memories that I still have with me. If your dad is still around, make it a priority to spend every birthday and father’s day with him and let him know how much you appreciate him being in your life.

 

Stevie Wonder- Asfam pic

NEWSY.com

For our ninth blog assignment, we were asked to explore NEWSY.com

Newsy.com has the latest and greatest news on the home page of it’s site. Newsy says that it is “the source for honest, in-depth context on stories that matter”. They are a national news site that desires to give people more context, solutions and understanding on the people and events that make up the world that we live in.

I looked at three different videos about three different topics on Newsy.

The first video that I looked at was about the death of Linda Brown. Linda Brown is the woman who as a child sparked the monumental case that would desegregate the education system, better known as Brown v. Board of Education. Brown was nine years old when her father was prohibited from enrolling her into an all white school in 1951. Brown, along with four other African American families sued the Topeka Board of Education and in 1954, the United States Supreme Court ruled that it was impossible for segregated schools to be equal and was therefore unconstitutional. Linda Brown passed away yesterday at the age of 76.

The second video I watched was about the death of Stephon Clark. On Sunday, March 18th, police fired 20 shots into the 22 year old who was unarmed, only carrying a cell phone. Authorities claim that they were responding to a call about a suspect near by and shot the subject because they were fearing for their safety. The two officers who shot Clark have been placed on administrative leave but charges have yet to be filed. Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office, the city Office of Public Safety Accountability and homicide detectives are all investigating this incident. According to various reports, both officers were wearing body cameras and the audio and video of the incident is set to be released in the next 30 days. Clark leaves behind a girlfriend, Salena Manni and two sons: Cairo and Aiden Clark.

Facebook sources tell CNN that CEO, Mark Zuckerburg has decided to testify before Congress about Facebook’s data practices. CNN says that the company is “currently planning the strategy for his testimony.” This comes as a shocker for many because yesterday, Zuckerburg turned down U.K. lawmakers request to answer any questions concerning how Facebook collects and stores users’ data. Facebook got in big trouble when it was revealed that Cambridge Analytica accessed around 50 million Facebook users’ data without their permission.